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The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Presents at the “Healthcare: Museums do that?” Congressional Briefing on Capitol Hill

Thu, 06/27/2013

MUSEUMS PLAY VITAL ROLE IN U.S. HEALTH CARE

Jacksonville, Fla. – The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens was one of four museums recently asked to present at the “Healthcare: Museums do that?” Congressional briefing on Capitol Hill. Maggie Reynolds, Associate Director of Education, spoke briefly on the impact of two programs, Women of Vision, an Art Beyond Sight initiative for visually impaired women and Connect at The Cummer, a series for Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers developed with the Memory Disorder Department at Mayo Clinic. Representatives from the other museums including, the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, The Newark Museum and the Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia presented topics ranging from pathogen studies to exhibitions on the effects of obesity.

“People were very surprised by and interested in the new roles that museums are playing in the community,” said Reynolds. “We tend to think of museums as simply public institutions in which to view art, but The Cummer galleries and historic gardens are used in interactive ways to offer intimate moments and experiences in healing and personal connection.”

Museums have long been essential pillars in America’s educational infrastructure. But increasingly, museums of all types and sizes are integral to U.S. health care, supporting medical research and training, initiating therapeutic programs for those with memory loss, children on the autism spectrum and veterans with combat-related illnesses, and inspiring healthier nutrition and behavior.

Examples of these and other health-related enterprises on the part of American museums are documented in a new report, “Museums on Call: How Museums are Addressing Health Issues,” released by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM). The full report, including a state-by-state appendix of examples, can be accessed at: http://www.aam-us.org/docs/advocacy/museums-on-call.pdf.

“This report showcases just one of the many ways museums have become essential community assets and service-providers,” said AAM president Ford W. Bell. “In addition to conserving and exhibiting our natural, scientific, cultural and historic heritages, museums also meet urgent community needs, and in today’s America health care is very much at the forefront of our field’s commitment to public service.”

Moreover, the museums that have initiated programs addressing these issues represent the breadth of the museums field ─ art museums, children’s museums, history museums and historic sites, natural history museums, science-technology centers, public and botanical gardens, zoos and aquariums.

“For too long, elected officials and other policy makers have viewed museums as amenities, rather than as essential community anchors,” Bell said. “This report is but a glimpse of the many public services provided by museums to our communities, all across the country.  Health care is a prime concern for leaders and average citizens alike, and museums are clearly striving to meet those needs.”

For more information on the unexpected work being done by museums in the fields of education, social welfare and public safety, among others, visit the Alliance website at www.aam-us.org .

About the American Alliance of Museums

The American Alliance of Museums is the largest museum service organization in the world, serving all types of museums, including art, history, science, botanic gardens, zoos, and aquariums.  The Alliance helps museums serve their communities by developing standards and best practices, offering professional training and resources, and serving as the national voice of museums for the public, media, and elected officials.  Working on behalf of 17,500 museums, 400,000 museum employees, thousands of volunteers and the visitors who come to museums 850 million times each year, The Alliance is dedicated to bolstering museums in promoting lifelong learning, celebrating cultural heritage, and inspiring the creative skills to compete in a global economy.  For more information, visit www.aam-us.org.  

About the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

For the past 50 years, the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens has been committed to engaging and inspiring through the arts, gardens and education. A permanent collection of nearly 5,000 objects and historic gardens on a riverfront campus offers more than 130,000 annual visitors a truly unique experience on the First Coast. Nationally recognized education programs serve adults and children of all abilities.  For more information, including hours, visit www.cummer.org.

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Thu, 06/27/2013

MUSEUMS PLAY VITAL ROLE IN U.S. HEALTH CARE

Jacksonville, Fla. – The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens was one of four museums recently asked to present at the “Healthcare: Museums do that?” Congressional briefing on Capitol Hill. Maggie Reynolds, Associate Director of Education, spoke briefly on the impact of two programs, Women of Vision, an Art Beyond Sight initiative for visually impaired women and Connect at The Cummer, a series for Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers developed with the Memory Disorder Department at Mayo Clinic. Representatives from the other museums including, the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, The Newark Museum and the Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia presented topics ranging from pathogen studies to exhibitions on the effects of obesity.

“People were very surprised by and interested in the new roles that museums are playing in the community,” said Reynolds. “We tend to think of museums as simply public institutions in which to view art, but The Cummer galleries and historic gardens are used in interactive ways to offer intimate moments and experiences in healing and personal connection.”

Museums have long been essential pillars in America’s educational infrastructure. But increasingly, museums of all types and sizes are integral to U.S. health care, supporting medical research and training, initiating therapeutic programs for those with memory loss, children on the autism spectrum and veterans with combat-related illnesses, and inspiring healthier nutrition and behavior.

Examples of these and other health-related enterprises on the part of American museums are documented in a new report, “Museums on Call: How Museums are Addressing Health Issues,” released by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM). The full report, including a state-by-state appendix of examples, can be accessed at: http://www.aam-us.org/docs/advocacy/museums-on-call.pdf.

“This report showcases just one of the many ways museums have become essential community assets and service-providers,” said AAM president Ford W. Bell. “In addition to conserving and exhibiting our natural, scientific, cultural and historic heritages, museums also meet urgent community needs, and in today’s America health care is very much at the forefront of our field’s commitment to public service.”

Moreover, the museums that have initiated programs addressing these issues represent the breadth of the museums field ─ art museums, children’s museums, history museums and historic sites, natural history museums, science-technology centers, public and botanical gardens, zoos and aquariums.

“For too long, elected officials and other policy makers have viewed museums as amenities, rather than as essential community anchors,” Bell said. “This report is but a glimpse of the many public services provided by museums to our communities, all across the country.  Health care is a prime concern for leaders and average citizens alike, and museums are clearly striving to meet those needs.”

For more information on the unexpected work being done by museums in the fields of education, social welfare and public safety, among others, visit the Alliance website at www.aam-us.org .

About the American Alliance of Museums

The American Alliance of Museums is the largest museum service organization in the world, serving all types of museums, including art, history, science, botanic gardens, zoos, and aquariums.  The Alliance helps museums serve their communities by developing standards and best practices, offering professional training and resources, and serving as the national voice of museums for the public, media, and elected officials.  Working on behalf of 17,500 museums, 400,000 museum employees, thousands of volunteers and the visitors who come to museums 850 million times each year, The Alliance is dedicated to bolstering museums in promoting lifelong learning, celebrating cultural heritage, and inspiring the creative skills to compete in a global economy.  For more information, visit www.aam-us.org.  

About the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

For the past 50 years, the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens has been committed to engaging and inspiring through the arts, gardens and education. A permanent collection of nearly 5,000 objects and historic gardens on a riverfront campus offers more than 130,000 annual visitors a truly unique experience on the First Coast. Nationally recognized education programs serve adults and children of all abilities.  For more information, including hours, visit www.cummer.org.

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MUSEUMS PLAY VITAL ROLE IN U.S. HEALTH CARE

Jacksonville, Fla. – The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens was one of four museums recently asked to present at the “Healthcare: Museums do that?” Congressional briefing on Capitol Hill. Maggie Reynolds, Associate Director of Education, spoke briefly on the impact of two programs, Women of Vision, an Art Beyond Sight initiative for visually impaired women and Connect at The Cummer, a series for Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers developed with the Memory Disorder Department at Mayo Clinic. Representatives from the other museums including, the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, The Newark Museum and the Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia presented topics ranging from pathogen studies to exhibitions on the effects of obesity.

“People were very surprised by and interested in the new roles that museums are playing in the community,” said Reynolds. “We tend to think of museums as simply public institutions in which to view art, but The Cummer galleries and historic gardens are used in interactive ways to offer intimate moments and experiences in healing and personal connection.”

Museums have long been essential pillars in America’s educational infrastructure. But increasingly, museums of all types and sizes are integral to U.S. health care, supporting medical research and training, initiating therapeutic programs for those with memory loss, children on the autism spectrum and veterans with combat-related illnesses, and inspiring healthier nutrition and behavior.

Examples of these and other health-related enterprises on the part of American museums are documented in a new report, “Museums on Call: How Museums are Addressing Health Issues,” released by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM). The full report, including a state-by-state appendix of examples, can be accessed at: http://www.aam-us.org/docs/advocacy/museums-on-call.pdf.

“This report showcases just one of the many ways museums have become essential community assets and service-providers,” said AAM president Ford W. Bell. “In addition to conserving and exhibiting our natural, scientific, cultural and historic heritages, museums also meet urgent community needs, and in today’s America health care is very much at the forefront of our field’s commitment to public service.”

Moreover, the museums that have initiated programs addressing these issues represent the breadth of the museums field ─ art museums, children’s museums, history museums and historic sites, natural history museums, science-technology centers, public and botanical gardens, zoos and aquariums.

“For too long, elected officials and other policy makers have viewed museums as amenities, rather than as essential community anchors,” Bell said. “This report is but a glimpse of the many public services provided by museums to our communities, all across the country.  Health care is a prime concern for leaders and average citizens alike, and museums are clearly striving to meet those needs.”

For more information on the unexpected work being done by museums in the fields of education, social welfare and public safety, among others, visit the Alliance website at www.aam-us.org .

About the American Alliance of Museums

The American Alliance of Museums is the largest museum service organization in the world, serving all types of museums, including art, history, science, botanic gardens, zoos, and aquariums.  The Alliance helps museums serve their communities by developing standards and best practices, offering professional training and resources, and serving as the national voice of museums for the public, media, and elected officials.  Working on behalf of 17,500 museums, 400,000 museum employees, thousands of volunteers and the visitors who come to museums 850 million times each year, The Alliance is dedicated to bolstering museums in promoting lifelong learning, celebrating cultural heritage, and inspiring the creative skills to compete in a global economy.  For more information, visit www.aam-us.org.  

About the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

For the past 50 years, the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens has been committed to engaging and inspiring through the arts, gardens and education. A permanent collection of nearly 5,000 objects and historic gardens on a riverfront campus offers more than 130,000 annual visitors a truly unique experience on the First Coast. Nationally recognized education programs serve adults and children of all abilities.  For more information, including hours, visit www.cummer.org.

###

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Thu, 06/27/2013

MUSEUMS PLAY VITAL ROLE IN U.S. HEALTH CARE

Jacksonville, Fla. – The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens was one of four museums recently asked to present at the “Healthcare: Museums do that?” Congressional briefing on Capitol Hill. Maggie Reynolds, Associate Director of Education, spoke briefly on the impact of two programs, Women of Vision, an Art Beyond Sight initiative for visually impaired women and Connect at The Cummer, a series for Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers developed with the Memory Disorder Department at Mayo Clinic. Representatives from the other museums including, the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, The Newark Museum and the Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia presented topics ranging from pathogen studies to exhibitions on the effects of obesity.

“People were very surprised by and interested in the new roles that museums are playing in the community,” said Reynolds. “We tend to think of museums as simply public institutions in which to view art, but The Cummer galleries and historic gardens are used in interactive ways to offer intimate moments and experiences in healing and personal connection.”

Museums have long been essential pillars in America’s educational infrastructure. But increasingly, museums of all types and sizes are integral to U.S. health care, supporting medical research and training, initiating therapeutic programs for those with memory loss, children on the autism spectrum and veterans with combat-related illnesses, and inspiring healthier nutrition and behavior.

Examples of these and other health-related enterprises on the part of American museums are documented in a new report, “Museums on Call: How Museums are Addressing Health Issues,” released by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM). The full report, including a state-by-state appendix of examples, can be accessed at: http://www.aam-us.org/docs/advocacy/museums-on-call.pdf.

“This report showcases just one of the many ways museums have become essential community assets and service-providers,” said AAM president Ford W. Bell. “In addition to conserving and exhibiting our natural, scientific, cultural and historic heritages, museums also meet urgent community needs, and in today’s America health care is very much at the forefront of our field’s commitment to public service.”

Moreover, the museums that have initiated programs addressing these issues represent the breadth of the museums field ─ art museums, children’s museums, history museums and historic sites, natural history museums, science-technology centers, public and botanical gardens, zoos and aquariums.

“For too long, elected officials and other policy makers have viewed museums as amenities, rather than as essential community anchors,” Bell said. “This report is but a glimpse of the many public services provided by museums to our communities, all across the country.  Health care is a prime concern for leaders and average citizens alike, and museums are clearly striving to meet those needs.”

For more information on the unexpected work being done by museums in the fields of education, social welfare and public safety, among others, visit the Alliance website at www.aam-us.org .

About the American Alliance of Museums

The American Alliance of Museums is the largest museum service organization in the world, serving all types of museums, including art, history, science, botanic gardens, zoos, and aquariums.  The Alliance helps museums serve their communities by developing standards and best practices, offering professional training and resources, and serving as the national voice of museums for the public, media, and elected officials.  Working on behalf of 17,500 museums, 400,000 museum employees, thousands of volunteers and the visitors who come to museums 850 million times each year, The Alliance is dedicated to bolstering museums in promoting lifelong learning, celebrating cultural heritage, and inspiring the creative skills to compete in a global economy.  For more information, visit www.aam-us.org.  

About the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

For the past 50 years, the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens has been committed to engaging and inspiring through the arts, gardens and education. A permanent collection of nearly 5,000 objects and historic gardens on a riverfront campus offers more than 130,000 annual visitors a truly unique experience on the First Coast. Nationally recognized education programs serve adults and children of all abilities.  For more information, including hours, visit www.cummer.org.

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