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The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Resolves Controversial Meissen Porcelain Case

Tue, 09/25/2012

Jacksonville, Fla. - The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is proud to announce the resolution of a Nazi-era provenance/restitution case regarding two items in the Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain. In 2010, information was discovered that brought the provenance of the pieces into question. After extensive research, The Cummer determined that the pieces, which have been in the Museum’s collection since 1965, had been illegally seized by the Nazis from the family of Gustav Von Klemperer, one of Germany’s leading bankers. Von Klemperer’s collection of more than 800 pieces of Meissen is widely regarded as one of the most significant collections ever assembled.  In September 2012, The Cummer returned these pieces to Mr. Von Klemperer’s heirs who have graciously agreed to lend the pieces back to the Museum for one year so that the story of their past may be shared with the community.

“The Cummer is proud to be returning the pieces to the family,” said Chief Curator Holly Keris. “It absolutely is the right thing to do, and I feel confident that Mr. Wark would have made the same decision had he known the true story behind these objects’ past.”

The pieces will be on display in the Betsy & William D. Lovett Gallery through September 2013. A text panel will be displayed next to each piece discussing their history. These pieces have also provided the Museum with a platform to discuss Nazi art looting. A lecture led by Keris, discussing Nazi related looting and restitution cases will be held on Tuesday, November 6 at 7 p.m. Admission is free for members and non-members. For more information, please call (904) 356-6857.

From 1933 through the end of World War II in 1945, the Nazi regime systematically pillaged cultural property and artworks throughout continental Europe.  Some of their loot was sold to fund Nazi-related activities; some became the property of senior party officials.  Other pieces were destroyed.  After the war, tens of thousands of confiscated objects were recovered by the Allies, but that was only a portion of the works stolen. Although exhaustive efforts were made to return these objects to their rightful owners, many works of art never found their way home. To this day, museums and individual collectors still struggle to verify the proper ownership of works of art that changed hands during these years.

For the past 50 years, the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens has been committed to engaging and inspiring through the arts, gardens and education. A permanent collection of nearly 5,000 objects and historic gardens on a riverfront campus offers more than 109,000 annual visitors a truly unique experience on the First Coast. Nationally recognized education programs serve adults and children of all abilities.  For more information, including hours, visit www.cummer.org

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Tue, 09/25/2012

Jacksonville, Fla. - The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is proud to announce the resolution of a Nazi-era provenance/restitution case regarding two items in the Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain. In 2010, information was discovered that brought the provenance of the pieces into question. After extensive research, The Cummer determined that the pieces, which have been in the Museum’s collection since 1965, had been illegally seized by the Nazis from the family of Gustav Von Klemperer, one of Germany’s leading bankers. Von Klemperer’s collection of more than 800 pieces of Meissen is widely regarded as one of the most significant collections ever assembled.  In September 2012, The Cummer returned these pieces to Mr. Von Klemperer’s heirs who have graciously agreed to lend the pieces back to the Museum for one year so that the story of their past may be shared with the community.

“The Cummer is proud to be returning the pieces to the family,” said Chief Curator Holly Keris. “It absolutely is the right thing to do, and I feel confident that Mr. Wark would have made the same decision had he known the true story behind these objects’ past.”

The pieces will be on display in the Betsy & William D. Lovett Gallery through September 2013. A text panel will be displayed next to each piece discussing their history. These pieces have also provided the Museum with a platform to discuss Nazi art looting. A lecture led by Keris, discussing Nazi related looting and restitution cases will be held on Tuesday, November 6 at 7 p.m. Admission is free for members and non-members. For more information, please call (904) 356-6857.

From 1933 through the end of World War II in 1945, the Nazi regime systematically pillaged cultural property and artworks throughout continental Europe.  Some of their loot was sold to fund Nazi-related activities; some became the property of senior party officials.  Other pieces were destroyed.  After the war, tens of thousands of confiscated objects were recovered by the Allies, but that was only a portion of the works stolen. Although exhaustive efforts were made to return these objects to their rightful owners, many works of art never found their way home. To this day, museums and individual collectors still struggle to verify the proper ownership of works of art that changed hands during these years.

For the past 50 years, the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens has been committed to engaging and inspiring through the arts, gardens and education. A permanent collection of nearly 5,000 objects and historic gardens on a riverfront campus offers more than 109,000 annual visitors a truly unique experience on the First Coast. Nationally recognized education programs serve adults and children of all abilities.  For more information, including hours, visit www.cummer.org

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Tue, 09/25/2012
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Jacksonville, Fla. - The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is proud to announce the resolution of a Nazi-era provenance/restitution case regarding two items in the Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain. In 2010, information was discovered that brought the provenance of the pieces into question. After extensive research, The Cummer determined that the pieces, which have been in the Museum’s collection since 1965, had been illegally seized by the Nazis from the family of Gustav Von Klemperer, one of Germany’s leading bankers. Von Klemperer’s collection of more than 800 pieces of Meissen is widely regarded as one of the most significant collections ever assembled.  In September 2012, The Cummer returned these pieces to Mr. Von Klemperer’s heirs who have graciously agreed to lend the pieces back to the Museum for one year so that the story of their past may be shared with the community.

“The Cummer is proud to be returning the pieces to the family,” said Chief Curator Holly Keris. “It absolutely is the right thing to do, and I feel confident that Mr. Wark would have made the same decision had he known the true story behind these objects’ past.”

The pieces will be on display in the Betsy & William D. Lovett Gallery through September 2013. A text panel will be displayed next to each piece discussing their history. These pieces have also provided the Museum with a platform to discuss Nazi art looting. A lecture led by Keris, discussing Nazi related looting and restitution cases will be held on Tuesday, November 6 at 7 p.m. Admission is free for members and non-members. For more information, please call (904) 356-6857.

From 1933 through the end of World War II in 1945, the Nazi regime systematically pillaged cultural property and artworks throughout continental Europe.  Some of their loot was sold to fund Nazi-related activities; some became the property of senior party officials.  Other pieces were destroyed.  After the war, tens of thousands of confiscated objects were recovered by the Allies, but that was only a portion of the works stolen. Although exhaustive efforts were made to return these objects to their rightful owners, many works of art never found their way home. To this day, museums and individual collectors still struggle to verify the proper ownership of works of art that changed hands during these years.

For the past 50 years, the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens has been committed to engaging and inspiring through the arts, gardens and education. A permanent collection of nearly 5,000 objects and historic gardens on a riverfront campus offers more than 109,000 annual visitors a truly unique experience on the First Coast. Nationally recognized education programs serve adults and children of all abilities.  For more information, including hours, visit www.cummer.org

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Tue, 09/25/2012

Jacksonville, Fla. - The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is proud to announce the resolution of a Nazi-era provenance/restitution case regarding two items in the Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain. In 2010, information was discovered that brought the provenance of the pieces into question. After extensive research, The Cummer determined that the pieces, which have been in the Museum’s collection since 1965, had been illegally seized by the Nazis from the family of Gustav Von Klemperer, one of Germany’s leading bankers. Von Klemperer’s collection of more than 800 pieces of Meissen is widely regarded as one of the most significant collections ever assembled.  In September 2012, The Cummer returned these pieces to Mr. Von Klemperer’s heirs who have graciously agreed to lend the pieces back to the Museum for one year so that the story of their past may be shared with the community.

“The Cummer is proud to be returning the pieces to the family,” said Chief Curator Holly Keris. “It absolutely is the right thing to do, and I feel confident that Mr. Wark would have made the same decision had he known the true story behind these objects’ past.”

The pieces will be on display in the Betsy & William D. Lovett Gallery through September 2013. A text panel will be displayed next to each piece discussing their history. These pieces have also provided the Museum with a platform to discuss Nazi art looting. A lecture led by Keris, discussing Nazi related looting and restitution cases will be held on Tuesday, November 6 at 7 p.m. Admission is free for members and non-members. For more information, please call (904) 356-6857.

From 1933 through the end of World War II in 1945, the Nazi regime systematically pillaged cultural property and artworks throughout continental Europe.  Some of their loot was sold to fund Nazi-related activities; some became the property of senior party officials.  Other pieces were destroyed.  After the war, tens of thousands of confiscated objects were recovered by the Allies, but that was only a portion of the works stolen. Although exhaustive efforts were made to return these objects to their rightful owners, many works of art never found their way home. To this day, museums and individual collectors still struggle to verify the proper ownership of works of art that changed hands during these years.

For the past 50 years, the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens has been committed to engaging and inspiring through the arts, gardens and education. A permanent collection of nearly 5,000 objects and historic gardens on a riverfront campus offers more than 109,000 annual visitors a truly unique experience on the First Coast. Nationally recognized education programs serve adults and children of all abilities.  For more information, including hours, visit www.cummer.org

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