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The Art of Empathy

Lecture by David Areford

Event Details:
December 3, 2013 - December 3, 2013
7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: Hixon Auditorium

Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

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Lecture by David Areford
Lectures and Workshops
Classes for Adults
Classes for Members
Event Start Date: 
Tue, 12/03/2013
Event Start Time: 
7:00 p.m.
Event End Time: 
8:00 p.m.
Event Location: 
Hixon Auditorium
Summary: 
<p>Free to the public.&nbsp; Lecture by <a href="http://www.umb.edu/academics/cla/faculty/david_s._areford" target="_blank"><strong>David S. Areford</strong></a>, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston on <em><a href="http://www.cummer.org/programs-events/calendar-of-events/art-empathy-cummer-mother-sorrows-context" target="_blank"><strong>The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context</strong></a>.</em></p>

Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

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Free to the public.  Lecture by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston on The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context.

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Free to the public.  Lecture by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston on The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context.

[safe] => <p>Free to the public.&nbsp; Lecture by <a href="http://www.umb.edu/academics/cla/faculty/david_s._areford" target="_blank"><strong>David S. Areford</strong></a>, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston on <em><a href="http://www.cummer.org/programs-events/calendar-of-events/art-empathy-cummer-mother-sorrows-context" target="_blank"><strong>The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context</strong></a>.</em></p> [#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => [#children] => <p>Free to the public.&nbsp; Lecture by <a href="http://www.umb.edu/academics/cla/faculty/david_s._areford" target="_blank"><strong>David S. Areford</strong></a>, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston on <em><a href="http://www.cummer.org/programs-events/calendar-of-events/art-empathy-cummer-mother-sorrows-context" target="_blank"><strong>The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context</strong></a>.</em></p> ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] => <p>Free to the public.&nbsp; Lecture by <a href="http://www.umb.edu/academics/cla/faculty/david_s._areford" target="_blank"><strong>David S. Areford</strong></a>, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston on <em><a href="http://www.cummer.org/programs-events/calendar-of-events/art-empathy-cummer-mother-sorrows-context" target="_blank"><strong>The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context</strong></a>.</em></p> [#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_eventsummary [#title] => Summary [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => above [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#children] => <p>Free to the public.&nbsp; Lecture by <a href="http://www.umb.edu/academics/cla/faculty/david_s._areford" target="_blank"><strong>David S. Areford</strong></a>, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston on <em><a href="http://www.cummer.org/programs-events/calendar-of-events/art-empathy-cummer-mother-sorrows-context" target="_blank"><strong>The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context</strong></a>.</em></p> [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>
Summary: 
<p>Free to the public.&nbsp; Lecture by <a href="http://www.umb.edu/academics/cla/faculty/david_s._areford" target="_blank"><strong>David S. Areford</strong></a>, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston on <em><a href="http://www.cummer.org/programs-events/calendar-of-events/art-empathy-cummer-mother-sorrows-context" target="_blank"><strong>The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context</strong></a>.</em></p>
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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

[format] => 2 [safe] =>

Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

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Lecture by David Areford
Lectures and Workshops
Classes for Adults
Classes for Members
Event Start Date: 
Tue, 12/03/2013
Event Start Time: 
7:00 p.m.
Event End Time: 
8:00 p.m.
Event Location: 
Hixon Auditorium
Summary: 
<p>Free to the public.&nbsp; Lecture by <a href="http://www.umb.edu/academics/cla/faculty/david_s._areford" target="_blank"><strong>David S. Areford</strong></a>, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston on <em><a href="http://www.cummer.org/programs-events/calendar-of-events/art-empathy-cummer-mother-sorrows-context" target="_blank"><strong>The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context</strong></a>.</em></p>

Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context. This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer.

Free to the public. Seating is limited, first come, first seated.

 

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