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The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context

Event Details:
November 26, 2013 - February 16, 2014
Location: The Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Millner Gallery

 

Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

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Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Tue, 11/26/2013 - Sun, 02/16/2014
Event Location: 
The Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Millner Gallery
Summary: 
<p>This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer&rsquo;s permanent collection, <em>Mother of Sorrows</em> (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the St&ouml;tteritz Altar and was declared the &ldquo;most important discovery in early German painting&rdquo; by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984.</p>

 

Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

[view] =>

 

Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

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This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984.

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Tue, 11/26/2013 - Sun, 02/16/2014
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Event Location: 
The Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Millner Gallery
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This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984.

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Summary: 
<p>This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer&rsquo;s permanent collection, <em>Mother of Sorrows</em> (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the St&ouml;tteritz Altar and was declared the &ldquo;most important discovery in early German painting&rdquo; by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984.</p>
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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

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Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

[#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

 

Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

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Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Tue, 11/26/2013 - Sun, 02/16/2014
Event Location: 
The Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Millner Gallery
Summary: 
<p>This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer&rsquo;s permanent collection, <em>Mother of Sorrows</em> (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the St&ouml;tteritz Altar and was declared the &ldquo;most important discovery in early German painting&rdquo; by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984.</p>

 

Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, c. 1480, oil on panel, 8 ¾ x 6 ½ in., Gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1.

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows (c. 1470). It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian Colin Eisler when it entered the collection in 1984. The exhibition, curated by David S. Areford, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will present new art historical and technical research that suggests that this work is a crucial link to the most important artists of Nuremberg (especially Hans Pleydenwurff and Michael Wolgemut, the teacher of Albrecht Dürer), as well as the German painter/printmaker Martin Schongauer. Beyond the context of fifteenth-century northern European art, the exhibition aims to illuminate the rich world of late medieval religious devotion, especially the cultivation of empathy. The artistic and devotional contexts will be explored through nineteen carefully selected artworks borrowed from collections in the United States and Germany, including the National Gallery of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Walters Art Museum, Houston’s Blaffer Foundation, Davison Art Center at Wesleyan Univeristy, Munich’s Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, and Aschaffenburg’s Stiftsmuseum. The objects are arranged in two thematic sections. “Hands, Hair, and Veil: Meaningful Details” elaborates on the cultural and religious meanings of these details in relation to the cult of relics and various devotional practices. “Seeing and Weeping: Passion and Compassion” explores images and texts designed to elicit an empathetic response to Christ’s Passion and the emotional suffering of his mother Mary.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts - Art Works and the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs.

Locally, The Cummer partnered with the Department of Art & Design at the University of North Florida. Professor Scott Brown’s upper level Medieval Art class adopted the exhibition and produced a companion website that explores works in the exhibition. To visit the website, click here http://arthistoryunf.wordpress.com/

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