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Beyond Ukiyo-e: Japanese Woodblock Prints and their influence on Western Art

Event Details:
December 15, 2011 - August 9, 2012
Location: The Joan Wellhouse and Martin Stein, Sr. Gallery

Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

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Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Thu, 12/15/2011 - Thu, 08/09/2012
Event Location: 
The Joan Wellhouse and Martin Stein, Sr. Gallery
Summary: 
<p>The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade.</p>

Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

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Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

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Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

[view] =>

Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

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The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade.

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Event Location: 
The Joan Wellhouse and Martin Stein, Sr. Gallery
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The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade.

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Summary: 
<p>The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade.</p>
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Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

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Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

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Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

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Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

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Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

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Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Thu, 12/15/2011 - Thu, 08/09/2012
Event Location: 
The Joan Wellhouse and Martin Stein, Sr. Gallery
Summary: 
<p>The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade.</p>

Unknown, Untitled woodblock, 19th Century, woodblock print, Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund

Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th Century, woodblock print, 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in., Purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund, AP.1994.4.1.

The culture of Japan remained a mystery to much of the Western hemisphere until 1853, when American Commodore Matthew Perry forcefully opened the country to foreign trade. As a result travelers and goods soon flowed between Japan, Europe, and America at an unprecedented rate. Japanese woodblock prints, used as packing material for porcelain, provided Europeans and Americans with their first glimpses of this insular nation.

By 1867, hundreds of Japanese woodblock prints were exhibited in museums and world fairs, and sold by art dealers and import shops. Artists in Paris quickly took notice, admiring the bold designs, unique perspective, compositional arrangements, and simplification of woodblock prints, and infused their own works with these elements. The term “Japonisme” would be coined to describe this newfound Western enthusiasm for Japanese art and culture. Visit Impressionism and Post-Impressionism from the High Museum of Art in the Mason Gallery from February 16 – May 6, 2012 to see some of the artists who were inspired by these woodblock prints.

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