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Eartha White and Ninah Cummer: Connecting with Community

Event Details:
December 11, 2012 - April 14, 2013
Location: The Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Millner Gallery

 

                                        
 
What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
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Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Tue, 12/11/2012 - Sun, 04/14/2013
Event Location: 
The Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Millner Gallery
Summary: 
<p>As part of the Fusion initiative, The Cummer will present an exhibition of archival material that documents the legacies of two important community leaders &ndash; Eartha White and Ninah Cummer.</p>

 

                                        
 
What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
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What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
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What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
[view] =>

 

                                        
 
What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
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As part of the Fusion initiative, The Cummer will present an exhibition of archival material that documents the legacies of two important community leaders – Eartha White and Ninah Cummer.

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Tue, 12/11/2012 - Sun, 04/14/2013
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Event Location: 
The Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Millner Gallery
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As part of the Fusion initiative, The Cummer will present an exhibition of archival material that documents the legacies of two important community leaders – Eartha White and Ninah Cummer.

[safe] => <p>As part of the Fusion initiative, The Cummer will present an exhibition of archival material that documents the legacies of two important community leaders &ndash; Eartha White and Ninah Cummer.</p> [#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => [#children] => <p>As part of the Fusion initiative, The Cummer will present an exhibition of archival material that documents the legacies of two important community leaders &ndash; Eartha White and Ninah Cummer.</p> ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] => <p>As part of the Fusion initiative, The Cummer will present an exhibition of archival material that documents the legacies of two important community leaders &ndash; Eartha White and Ninah Cummer.</p> [#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_eventsummary [#title] => Summary [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => above [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#children] => <p>As part of the Fusion initiative, The Cummer will present an exhibition of archival material that documents the legacies of two important community leaders &ndash; Eartha White and Ninah Cummer.</p> [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>
Summary: 
<p>As part of the Fusion initiative, The Cummer will present an exhibition of archival material that documents the legacies of two important community leaders &ndash; Eartha White and Ninah Cummer.</p>
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What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
[format] => 2 [safe] =>

 

                                        
 
What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
[#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => [#children] =>

 

                                        
 
What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

 

                                        
 
What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
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What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
[#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

 

                                        
 
What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
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Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Tue, 12/11/2012 - Sun, 04/14/2013
Event Location: 
The Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Millner Gallery
Summary: 
<p>As part of the Fusion initiative, The Cummer will present an exhibition of archival material that documents the legacies of two important community leaders &ndash; Eartha White and Ninah Cummer.</p>

 

                                        
 
What does philanthropy look like? Ninah M. H. Cummer, the patron of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, was a wealthy white woman with a passion for art, who sought to extend her love of beautiful surroundings from her private garden to the parks and public spaces of Jacksonville. Eartha M. M. White, a black woman of modest means, established — through sheer force of will — a wide range of social support agencies for the city’s homeless, poor, aged, and neglected.  Through photographs, letters, and ephemera, this exhibition celebrates two strong women who helped shape Jacksonville in the twentieth century, and whose legacies remain vibrant today. Materials for the exhibition were sourced from the Clara White Mission; the Jacksonville Historical Society; the University of North Florida Thomas G. Carpenter Library, Special Collections; and the Archives of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.  This exhibition sheds light on the themes of tolerance and community that are being explored by the Cultural Fusion initiative, a vibrant cultural collaborative that catalyzes our community. There are many strong women community leaders in Jacksonville today. Hear their “voices” as they carry on the legacy of Ms. White and Mrs. Cummer.

 

Image Credits:

Eartha White at age 36, 1912, photograph.  Courtesy of the Clara White Mission. 

Ninah M.H. Cummer, photograph.  The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives.

 
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