American Association of Museums logo

Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings

Event Details:
October 7, 2011 - January 8, 2012

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

stdClass Object ( [nid] => 274 [type] => event [language] => en [uid] => 3 [status] => 1 [created] => 1319556510 [changed] => 1322851783 [comment] => 0 [promote] => 0 [moderate] => 0 [sticky] => 0 [tnid] => 0 [translate] => 0 [vid] => 274 [revision_uid] => 1 [title] => Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings [body] =>
Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Fri, 10/07/2011 - Sun, 01/08/2012
Summary: 
<p>American artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper.</p>

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

[log] => [revision_timestamp] => 1322851783 [format] => 0 [name] => trsgadmin [picture] => [data] => a:2:{s:13:"form_build_id";s:37:"form-006a0eed9507c35d51a7774aa757301d";s:5:"block";a:1:{s:6:"system";a:1:{i:0;i:0;}}} [path] => programs-events/calendar-of-events/eugene-savage-seminole-paintings [field_eventstarttime] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] => [safe] => [view] => ) ) [field_subtitle] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] => [safe] => [view] => ) ) [field_eventendtime] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] => [safe] => [view] => ) ) [field_eventloc] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] => [safe] => [view] => ) ) [field_ex_feature] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] => Yes [safe] => Yes ) ) [field_eventdetails] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] =>

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

[format] => 2 [safe] =>

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

[view] =>

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

) ) [field_eventsummary] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] =>

American artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper.

[safe] => <p>American artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper.</p> [view] => <p>American artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper.</p> ) ) [field_eventcat] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] => EX [safe] => EX [view] => Exhibitions ) ) [field_eventdate] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] => 2011-10-07 00:00:00 [value2] => 2012-01-08 00:00:00 [rrule] => [timezone] => America/New_York [timezone_db] => America/New_York [date_type] => datetime [view] => Fri, 10/07/2011 - Sun, 01/08/2012 ) ) [field_featured] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] => No [safe] => No ) ) [field_feature_body] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] => [safe] => ) ) [current_revision_id] => 274 [is_current] => 1 [num_revisions] => 1 [revision_moderation] => [is_pending] => [_workflow] => [taxonomy] => Array ( ) [page_title] => [nodewords] => Array ( [abstract] => Array ( [value] => ) [canonical] => Array ( [value] => ) [copyright] => Array ( [value] => ) [dcterms.contributor] => Array ( [value] => ) [dcterms.creator] => Array ( [value] => ) [dcterms.date] => Array ( [value] => Array ( [month] => 10 [day] => 26 [year] => 2011 ) ) [dcterms.title] => Array ( [value] => ) [description] => Array ( [value] => ) [keywords] => Array ( [value] => ) [location] => Array ( [latitude] => [longitude] => ) [revisit-after] => Array ( [value] => 1 ) [robots] => Array ( [value] => Array ( [noarchive] => 0 [nofollow] => 0 [noindex] => 0 [noodp] => 0 [nosnippet] => 0 [noydir] => 0 ) [use_default] => 0 ) ) [build_mode] => 0 [readmore] => [content] => Array ( [field_subtitle] => Array ( [#type_name] => event [#context] => full [#field_name] => field_subtitle [#post_render] => Array ( [0] => content_field_wrapper_post_render ) [#weight] => -3 [field] => Array ( [#description] => [items] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [#formatter] => default [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type_name] => event [#field_name] => field_subtitle [#weight] => 0 [#theme] => text_formatter_default [#item] => Array ( [value] => [safe] => [#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => ) [#title] => [#description] => [#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_subtitle [#title] => Event Subtitle [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => hidden [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#printed] => 1 ) [field_eventcat] => Array ( [#type_name] => event [#context] => full [#field_name] => field_eventcat [#post_render] => Array ( [0] => content_field_wrapper_post_render ) [#weight] => -2 [field] => Array ( [#description] => [items] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [#formatter] => default [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type_name] => event [#field_name] => field_eventcat [#weight] => 0 [#theme] => text_formatter_default [#item] => Array ( [value] => EX [safe] => EX [#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => [#children] => Exhibitions ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] => Exhibitions [#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_eventcat [#title] => Event Type [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => hidden [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#children] => Exhibitions [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>
Exhibitions
[#printed] => 1 ) [#content_extra_fields] => Array ( [title] => Array ( [label] => Title [description] => Node module form. [weight] => -5 ) [revision_information] => Array ( [label] => Revision information [description] => Node module form. [weight] => 9 ) [author] => Array ( [label] => Authoring information [description] => Node module form. [weight] => 8 ) [options] => Array ( [label] => Publishing options [description] => Node module form. [weight] => 10 ) [menu] => Array ( [label] => Menu settings [description] => Menu module form. [weight] => 3 ) [path] => Array ( [label] => Path settings [description] => Path module form. [weight] => 11 ) [workflow] => Array ( [label] => Workflow [description] => Workflow module form [weight] => 7 ) [nodewords] => Array ( [label] => Meta tags [description] => Meta tags fieldset. [weight] => 12 ) ) [body] => Array ( [#weight] => 0 [#value] => [#title] => [#description] => [#printed] => 1 ) [field_eventdate] => Array ( [#type_name] => event [#context] => full [#field_name] => field_eventdate [#post_render] => Array ( [0] => content_field_wrapper_post_render ) [#weight] => 0 [field] => Array ( [#description] => [items] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [#formatter] => default [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type_name] => event [#field_name] => field_eventdate [#weight] => 0 [#theme] => date_formatter_default [#item] => Array ( [value] => 2011-10-07 00:00:00 [value2] => 2012-01-08 00:00:00 [rrule] => [timezone] => America/New_York [timezone_db] => America/New_York [date_type] => datetime [#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => [#children] => Fri, 10/07/2011 - Sun, 01/08/2012 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] => Fri, 10/07/2011 - Sun, 01/08/2012 [#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_eventdate [#title] => Event Start Date [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => inline [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#children] => Fri, 10/07/2011 - Sun, 01/08/2012 [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>
Event Start Date: 
Fri, 10/07/2011 - Sun, 01/08/2012
[#printed] => 1 ) [#pre_render] => Array ( [0] => content_alter_extra_weights ) [field_eventstarttime] => Array ( [#type_name] => event [#context] => full [#field_name] => field_eventstarttime [#post_render] => Array ( [0] => content_field_wrapper_post_render ) [#weight] => 1 [field] => Array ( [#description] => [items] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [#formatter] => default [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type_name] => event [#field_name] => field_eventstarttime [#weight] => 0 [#theme] => text_formatter_default [#item] => Array ( [value] => [safe] => [#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => ) [#title] => [#description] => [#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_eventstarttime [#title] => Event Start Time [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => inline [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#printed] => 1 ) [field_eventendtime] => Array ( [#type_name] => event [#context] => full [#field_name] => field_eventendtime [#post_render] => Array ( [0] => content_field_wrapper_post_render ) [#weight] => 2 [field] => Array ( [#description] => [items] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [#formatter] => default [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type_name] => event [#field_name] => field_eventendtime [#weight] => 0 [#theme] => text_formatter_default [#item] => Array ( [value] => [safe] => [#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => ) [#title] => [#description] => [#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_eventendtime [#title] => Event End Time [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => inline [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#printed] => 1 ) [field_eventloc] => Array ( [#type_name] => event [#context] => full [#field_name] => field_eventloc [#post_render] => Array ( [0] => content_field_wrapper_post_render ) [#weight] => 4 [field] => Array ( [#description] => [items] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [#formatter] => default [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type_name] => event [#field_name] => field_eventloc [#weight] => 0 [#theme] => text_formatter_default [#item] => Array ( [value] => [safe] => [#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => ) [#title] => [#description] => [#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_eventloc [#title] => Event Location [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => inline [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#printed] => 1 ) [field_eventsummary] => Array ( [#type_name] => event [#context] => full [#field_name] => field_eventsummary [#post_render] => Array ( [0] => content_field_wrapper_post_render ) [#weight] => 5 [field] => Array ( [#description] => [items] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [#formatter] => default [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type_name] => event [#field_name] => field_eventsummary [#weight] => 0 [#theme] => text_formatter_default [#item] => Array ( [value] =>

American artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper.

[safe] => <p>American artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper.</p> [#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => [#children] => <p>American artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper.</p> ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] => <p>American artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper.</p> [#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_eventsummary [#title] => Summary [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => above [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#children] => <p>American artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper.</p> [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>
Summary: 
<p>American artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper.</p>
[#printed] => 1 ) [field_eventdetails] => Array ( [#type_name] => event [#context] => full [#field_name] => field_eventdetails [#post_render] => Array ( [0] => content_field_wrapper_post_render ) [#weight] => 6 [field] => Array ( [#description] => [items] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [#formatter] => default [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type_name] => event [#field_name] => field_eventdetails [#weight] => 0 [#theme] => text_formatter_default [#item] => Array ( [value] =>

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

[format] => 2 [safe] =>

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

[#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => [#children] =>

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

[#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_eventdetails [#title] => Event Details [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => hidden [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#children] =>

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

[#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

[#printed] => 1 ) [group_feature] => Array ( [#type_name] => event [#context] => full [#group_name] => group_feature [#post_render] => Array ( [0] => fieldgroup_wrapper_post_render ) [#weight] => 13 [group] => Array ( [#parents] => Array ( ) [#collapsible] => [#collapsed] => [#value] => [#tree] => [#required] => [#description] => [#type] => fieldgroup_fieldset [#attributes] => Array ( [class] => fieldgroup group-feature ) [#title] => [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>
Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Fri, 10/07/2011 - Sun, 01/08/2012
Summary: 
<p>American artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper.</p>

Eugene Savage: The Seminole PaintingsAmerican artist Eugene Savage is best known today as a muralist. However, in the 1930s he became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper. In 2007, The Cummer purchased more than 100 of these important works for its permanent collection.

These paintings, drawings, and watercolors not only document the Seminole costume and tribal customs, they also are important works of art in their own right. Each presents Seminole traditions, threatened by encroachment on the Everglades, in a very artistic manner reminiscent of Surrealist dreamscapes and Art Deco sensibilities.

If you would like to learn more about the Art of Florida, please click on the link below to download a Reading Resource list. This guide is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council.

Reading Resource Guide

Sponsors: 50th Anniversary Host Committee, Agility Press, Inc., Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Bank of America, City of Jacksonville, Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, Inc., Education Partners for the 50th, Elkins Constructors, Inc., Florida Humanities Council, The Florida Times-Union, jacksonville.com, Merrill Lynch, National Endowment for the Humanities, Shepherd Agency, State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, Wells Fargo, WJCT Public Broadcasting.

[#printed] => 1 ) [links] => Array ( ) )