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Jim Draper: Feast of Flowers

Event Details:
December 18, 2012 - April 7, 2013
Location: The Joan Wellhouse and Martin Stein, Sr. Gallery

Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

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Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Tue, 12/18/2012 - Sun, 04/07/2013
Event Location: 
The Joan Wellhouse and Martin Stein, Sr. Gallery
Summary: 
<p>Jacksonville artist Jim Draper&rsquo;s newest series &ldquo;Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers&rdquo; celebrates the 500<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States.</p>

Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

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Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

[format] => 2 [safe] =>

Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

[view] =>

Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

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Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States.

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Tue, 12/18/2012 - Sun, 04/07/2013
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Event Location: 
The Joan Wellhouse and Martin Stein, Sr. Gallery
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Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States.

[safe] => <p>Jacksonville artist Jim Draper&rsquo;s newest series &ldquo;Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers&rdquo; celebrates the 500<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States.</p> [#delta] => 0 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#theme_used] => 1 [#printed] => 1 [#type] => [#value] => [#prefix] => [#suffix] => [#children] => <p>Jacksonville artist Jim Draper&rsquo;s newest series &ldquo;Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers&rdquo; celebrates the 500<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States.</p> ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] => <p>Jacksonville artist Jim Draper&rsquo;s newest series &ldquo;Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers&rdquo; celebrates the 500<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States.</p> [#printed] => 1 ) [#single] => 1 [#attributes] => Array ( ) [#required] => [#parents] => Array ( ) [#tree] => [#context] => full [#page] => 1 [#field_name] => field_eventsummary [#title] => Summary [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => above [#teaser] => [#node] => stdClass Object *RECURSION* [#type] => content_field [#children] => <p>Jacksonville artist Jim Draper&rsquo;s newest series &ldquo;Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers&rdquo; celebrates the 500<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States.</p> [#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>
Summary: 
<p>Jacksonville artist Jim Draper&rsquo;s newest series &ldquo;Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers&rdquo; celebrates the 500<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States.</p>
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Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

[format] => 2 [safe] =>

Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

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Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

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Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

[#printed] => 1 ) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

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Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Tue, 12/18/2012 - Sun, 04/07/2013
Event Location: 
The Joan Wellhouse and Martin Stein, Sr. Gallery
Summary: 
<p>Jacksonville artist Jim Draper&rsquo;s newest series &ldquo;Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers&rdquo; celebrates the 500<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States.</p>

Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60 inches.  © Jim Draper. 

Jacksonville artist Jim Draper’s newest series “Pascua Florida: Feast of Flowers” celebrates the 500th anniversary of the first European engagement with Florida, the first named area in what is now the United States. This exhibition and its related programming serve as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists, and writers will provide essential material as anchors for the pictorial narratives that are being created for this exhibition. Its title, “Pascua de Florida” (Feast of Flowers), lifted from the naming of Florida in 1513,  signals the attempt to explore the idea of natural resources as consumable commodities, while embracing the conceptual history of hungry European settlers in “la Florida’s” bountiful banquet, and Ponce de Leon’s painstaking search of the mythological Fountain of Youth.

Exhibition Sponsors: Christopher and Lyssa Ball, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Donahoo III

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