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On the Silk Road and the High Seas: Chinese Ceramics, Culture, and Commerce

Event Details:
May 13, 2011 - August 14, 2011

Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

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Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Fri, 05/13/2011 - Sun, 08/14/2011

Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

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Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

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Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

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Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

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Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

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Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

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Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

) [#title] => [#description] => [#children] =>

Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

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Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

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Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

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Exhibitions
Event Start Date: 
Fri, 05/13/2011 - Sun, 08/14/2011

Drawn from the Doris and Leo Hodroff collection at the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition tells the stories of why Chinese ceramics were so special at home and particularly abroad. Since the second century BCE, the so-called “Silk Road” stretched thousands of miles from eastern China to the Black Sea, thus linking the great civilizations of east Asia with those of southwest Asia and, thereby, to Europe. In later centuries the trade and cultural influences that flowed back and forth on land were transferred to the sea, and maritime shipping eventually came to dominate world commerce. The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition, considered to be one of the finest in the world, were rarities in the Western world until the mid-18th century.

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