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Visiting With Children

Keeping these tips in mind may help your visit be more engaging for your children.

Review proper Museum etiquette

Being in an art museum is different from being at home or school, and therefore, our behavior is different. Remind your child of the general rules of being a visitor.  There is no touching in the galleries. Our hands carry dirt and oils that can damage artwork. Touching is allowed in Art Connections and the Gardens. We do not run in any part of the museum and remain quiet and use low volume voices. Food is not allowed in any part of the Museum except for the concourse near TreeCup Café and in the Gardens. Also, children must be supervised at all times, including your visit to Art Connections.

Preview the artwork here

When children see images repeatedly, they become familiar and excited with them. Viewing works of art on The Cummer website offers a preview of what they will see and opens a conversation about copies of art images verses the “real thing.”

Check the events calendar

The Cummer offers many classes and programs for children ages three through high school. We also offer Family Nights and Community Events with art projects, music and other entertainment scattered throughout the Museum. Participating in structured activities at The Cummer is a great way to get your feet wet and learn some first-hand tips from our resident art educators. See our calendar for more details.

Ask Questions

Engage your young art enthusiast by asking questions. “What do you see?” “What shapes and colors do you see?” “What are the people doing in the painting?” This way, he is looking more closely and learning how to converse about art.

Use Five Senses

We all perceive the world through our senses, but especially young children.  Museums are not just for looking. Think about what they can hear, smell, touch and taste. Some senses are fed in different parts of the museum but challenge him to meet all five.

Take advantage of Art Connections and The Cummer Gardens as sensory experiences. Touch artwork, cut and glue paper, and build a sculpture in Art Connections. Smell the scents of flowers, listen to birds and the river flowing, and touch the sculptures in the Gardens.

Have No Expectations

Don’t expect your little one to be an art connoisseur right away. If you go into this adventure with no expectations of what your child should learn or say or do, it will make for a more relaxing experience. Build on the experiences by visiting often and you’ll see that your child will slowly form his own impression of the Museum and what’s inside.

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Keeping these tips in mind may help your visit be more engaging for your children.

Review proper Museum etiquette

Being in an art museum is different from being at home or school, and therefore, our behavior is different. Remind your child of the general rules of being a visitor.  There is no touching in the galleries. Our hands carry dirt and oils that can damage artwork. Touching is allowed in Art Connections and the Gardens. We do not run in any part of the museum and remain quiet and use low volume voices. Food is not allowed in any part of the Museum except for the concourse near TreeCup Café and in the Gardens. Also, children must be supervised at all times, including your visit to Art Connections.

Preview the artwork here

When children see images repeatedly, they become familiar and excited with them. Viewing works of art on The Cummer website offers a preview of what they will see and opens a conversation about copies of art images verses the “real thing.”

Check the events calendar

The Cummer offers many classes and programs for children ages three through high school. We also offer Family Nights and Community Events with art projects, music and other entertainment scattered throughout the Museum. Participating in structured activities at The Cummer is a great way to get your feet wet and learn some first-hand tips from our resident art educators. See our calendar for more details.

Ask Questions

Engage your young art enthusiast by asking questions. “What do you see?” “What shapes and colors do you see?” “What are the people doing in the painting?” This way, he is looking more closely and learning how to converse about art.

Use Five Senses

We all perceive the world through our senses, but especially young children.  Museums are not just for looking. Think about what they can hear, smell, touch and taste. Some senses are fed in different parts of the museum but challenge him to meet all five.

Take advantage of Art Connections and The Cummer Gardens as sensory experiences. Touch artwork, cut and glue paper, and build a sculpture in Art Connections. Smell the scents of flowers, listen to birds and the river flowing, and touch the sculptures in the Gardens.

Have No Expectations

Don’t expect your little one to be an art connoisseur right away. If you go into this adventure with no expectations of what your child should learn or say or do, it will make for a more relaxing experience. Build on the experiences by visiting often and you’ll see that your child will slowly form his own impression of the Museum and what’s inside.

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Keeping these tips in mind may help your visit be more engaging for your children.

Review proper Museum etiquette

Being in an art museum is different from being at home or school, and therefore, our behavior is different. Remind your child of the general rules of being a visitor.  There is no touching in the galleries. Our hands carry dirt and oils that can damage artwork. Touching is allowed in Art Connections and the Gardens. We do not run in any part of the museum and remain quiet and use low volume voices. Food is not allowed in any part of the Museum except for the concourse near TreeCup Café and in the Gardens. Also, children must be supervised at all times, including your visit to Art Connections.

Preview the artwork here

When children see images repeatedly, they become familiar and excited with them. Viewing works of art on The Cummer website offers a preview of what they will see and opens a conversation about copies of art images verses the “real thing.”

Check the events calendar

The Cummer offers many classes and programs for children ages three through high school. We also offer Family Nights and Community Events with art projects, music and other entertainment scattered throughout the Museum. Participating in structured activities at The Cummer is a great way to get your feet wet and learn some first-hand tips from our resident art educators. See our calendar for more details.

Ask Questions

Engage your young art enthusiast by asking questions. “What do you see?” “What shapes and colors do you see?” “What are the people doing in the painting?” This way, he is looking more closely and learning how to converse about art.

Use Five Senses

We all perceive the world through our senses, but especially young children.  Museums are not just for looking. Think about what they can hear, smell, touch and taste. Some senses are fed in different parts of the museum but challenge him to meet all five.

Take advantage of Art Connections and The Cummer Gardens as sensory experiences. Touch artwork, cut and glue paper, and build a sculpture in Art Connections. Smell the scents of flowers, listen to birds and the river flowing, and touch the sculptures in the Gardens.

Have No Expectations

Don’t expect your little one to be an art connoisseur right away. If you go into this adventure with no expectations of what your child should learn or say or do, it will make for a more relaxing experience. Build on the experiences by visiting often and you’ll see that your child will slowly form his own impression of the Museum and what’s inside.

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Keeping these tips in mind may help your visit be more engaging for your children.

Review proper Museum etiquette

Being in an art museum is different from being at home or school, and therefore, our behavior is different. Remind your child of the general rules of being a visitor.  There is no touching in the galleries. Our hands carry dirt and oils that can damage artwork. Touching is allowed in Art Connections and the Gardens. We do not run in any part of the museum and remain quiet and use low volume voices. Food is not allowed in any part of the Museum except for the concourse near TreeCup Café and in the Gardens. Also, children must be supervised at all times, including your visit to Art Connections.

Preview the artwork here

When children see images repeatedly, they become familiar and excited with them. Viewing works of art on The Cummer website offers a preview of what they will see and opens a conversation about copies of art images verses the “real thing.”

Check the events calendar

The Cummer offers many classes and programs for children ages three through high school. We also offer Family Nights and Community Events with art projects, music and other entertainment scattered throughout the Museum. Participating in structured activities at The Cummer is a great way to get your feet wet and learn some first-hand tips from our resident art educators. See our calendar for more details.

Ask Questions

Engage your young art enthusiast by asking questions. “What do you see?” “What shapes and colors do you see?” “What are the people doing in the painting?” This way, he is looking more closely and learning how to converse about art.

Use Five Senses

We all perceive the world through our senses, but especially young children.  Museums are not just for looking. Think about what they can hear, smell, touch and taste. Some senses are fed in different parts of the museum but challenge him to meet all five.

Take advantage of Art Connections and The Cummer Gardens as sensory experiences. Touch artwork, cut and glue paper, and build a sculpture in Art Connections. Smell the scents of flowers, listen to birds and the river flowing, and touch the sculptures in the Gardens.

Have No Expectations

Don’t expect your little one to be an art connoisseur right away. If you go into this adventure with no expectations of what your child should learn or say or do, it will make for a more relaxing experience. Build on the experiences by visiting often and you’ll see that your child will slowly form his own impression of the Museum and what’s inside.

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